Prevention & community spread

Take everyday actions to protect yourself and those you love
  • There are effective ways to reduce the risk to yourself and the people you care about.
    • Frequently and thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
    • Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash, or use your inner elbow or sleeve.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
    • Stay home if you’re sick, and keep your children home if they are sick.
    • Clean surfaces in your home, and personal items such as cell phones, using regular household products.
  • Be calm and prepared.
  • ​People who are not sick do not need face masks to protect themselves from respiratory viruses, including COVID-19. Ill people should wear a mask if they have one -- to protect family members and in any scenario where needed to prevent the spread of germs.

Higher-risk people
  • Certain people are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, including:
    • Older people (over age 60), especially those over 80.
    • People who have chronic medical conditions like heart, lung, or kidney disease, or diabetes.
    • Older people with chronic medical conditions are at the highest risk.
  • People at higher risk should take action now to be prepared for this virus if there is an outbreak in their community. CDC has the information you need to prepare.
  • ​Everyone's daily preventive actions are important in reducing spread to people who may experience more severe illness.

If you are sick

It is important to call ahead before going to see a doctor or emergency room to prevent the spread of illness. Tell them your symptoms and that you suspect you were exposed to someone with COVID-19 or had recent travel to a place that is experiencing community spread.

 


Stay informed with reliable sources of information and share accurate information with neighbors, friends and co-workers, especially people who may have difficulty receiving or understanding the information. 

Community spread can mean a few different things.

  • Limited person-to-person spread (or transmission) means a person in Colorado became infected from a known exposure to another person in Colorado.
  • Limited community spread (or transmission) means there are cases and outbreaks in certain communities where people became infected, and we are unable to identify the source.
  • Widespread community spread (or transmission) means there are cases and outbreaks in many communities where people are spreading the virus to other people.

Be prepared for community spread of COVID-19 in Colorado.

PRACTICE EVERYDAY ACTIONS
  • Frequently and thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash, or use your inner elbow or sleeve.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands
  • Stay home if you’re sick, and keep your children home if they are sick.
  • Clean surfaces in your home, and personal items such as cell phones, using regular household products.
PRACTICE SOCIAL DISTANCING
  • Social distancing public health order.
  • Don’t shake hands. Instead, bump fists or elbows.
  • When possible, increase distance between people to six feet to help reduce spread.
  • Consider whether you want to take a trip or attend public gatherings.
  • Follow CDC guidelines on travel.
  • If there is ongoing spread in your community, consider reducing the number of large group gatherings or activities.  
  • Discourage children and teens from gathering in other public places if school is closed.
COMMUNITY INTERVENTIONS
  • Establish community-based interventions such as school dismissals, event cancellations, and create employee plans to work remotely to help slow the spread of COVID-19.
  • If there is ongoing spread in a community, local and state officials, in consultation with federal officials when appropriate, will make decisions about implementing community interventions based on the scope of community spread.
  • Community interventions may be different for each community.